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If fat shaming is okay, then shaming everyone should be okay.

Everyone has issues. Everyone. Every single person walking around in the world has some sort of personal struggle. They may have problems with their job, with their spouse, with their children, with their money, or with their siblings. They may have substance abuse problems, they may drink too much, or maybe they have health problems.

For a lot of people, it’s easy to hide their problems if they want to. You can’t tell by looking at a person if they have money problems or a child whose behavior at school is out of control. You can’t tell if they have health problems or if they’re struggling with depression.

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The thing about being overweight is that you can’t hide it. Anyone who looks at you can tell that you are overweight. And for some reason, people think that means it’s okay to criticize, to offer unsolicited advice, to say things like “Why don’t you just lose the weight?

So, I propose that we require every American adult to wear a t-shirt that states exactly what their personal problems are, so we can all offer our opinions. People who are struggling with their finances could wear a t-shirt showing their credit score. People with a drinking problem could wear a shirt that says “I drink an entire bottle of wine every single night. Sometimes two.” Or perhaps a shirt that lists all the medications they take, including anti-depressants and Viagra.

That seems radical, doesn’t it? But it would level the playing field.

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After her inauguration outfit sparked jeers, Kellyanne Conway shot back with “Sorry to offend the black-stretch-pants-wearing women of America with a little color.” In another interview on CBS Sunday Morning, she added that if you walk through any airport, you see women who never wear anything that snaps, buttons, or zips. That seems like an odd way to defend one’s choice of clothing. She could have just said she chose the outfit because she liked it, and if it’s not everyone’s cup of tea, that’s okay. But no, she had to take a jab at women who are not as thin as she is. Why? Presumably because she could.

So, what’s printed on your t-shirt, Kellyanne? Is everything in your life so perfect that you can take jabs at women whose imperfections are in full public view?

Think about that the next time you hear someone making remarks about a person’s weight. Just because a person’s problems are visible doesn’t give anyone the right to judge them. Think about what your own t-shirt would say about you.

People seem always to be looking for others who are inferior in some way. For many, it seems to be the only way they can feel good about themselves. That’s what fat shaming is all about. But make no mistake — no one has ever uttered a criticism of a woman’s hips or a man’s beer belly who does not themselves have plenty of their own problems. It’s sort of like the anonymity of flipping the bird at someone while you’re driving. People who fat shame have their own problems and struggles. But because they don’t wear a t-shirt announcing their personal issues, they believe they are somehow superior to those who can’t hide the battles they’re fighting.

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